THE SOUTH AFRICAN
DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY
GROUP

facebooktwitter

IN THE WORKPLACE

New Research on Depression in the Workplace.

For more information please click here

business

SADAG NEWSLETTER

To subscribe to SADAG's newsletter, click here

JOURNAL

Mental Health Matters Journal for Psychiatrists & GP's

MHM September 207x300

Click here for more info on articles & how to subscribe

SPEAKING BOOKS

suicide book

Literacy is a luxury that many of us take for granted.  We depend on written communication for information, guidance, and access to heath care information That is why SADAG created SPEAKING BOOKS and revolutionized the way information is delivered to low literacy communities. It's exactly what it sounds like.a book that talks to the reader in his or her local  language, delivering critical information in an interactive, and educational way.

The customizable 16-page book, accompanied by local celebrity audio recordings, ensures that vital health and social messages can be seen, heard, read and understood..

We started with books on Teen Suicide prevention , HIV, AIDS and Depression, Understanding Mental Health and have developed over 30 titles, such as TB, Malaria, Polio, Vaccines for over 30 countries.

depression book

MYTH #1

YOU'LL GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS.
Almost half the people in the U.S. with clinical depression don't get diagnosed properly, says Wayne Katon, nosed M.D., of the University of Washington Medical School in Seattle. In part, that's because many clinicians use a test developed in the 1950s called the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, which was designed to measure antidepressant effectiveness, not to diagnose depression, says Andrew G. Ryder, Ph.D., of Concordia University in Montreal. The test overlooks some symptoms that indicate depression (such as sleeping too much) and highlights others that aren't always relevant (such as weight loss). When trying to diagnose or rule out depression, nothing is more important than detailed conversations with your doctor.

MYTH #2

MEN AND WOMEN HAVE THE SAME RISK FOR DEPRESSION.
In fact, women are twice as likely as men to experience major depression. Scientists think hormones, an increased tendency to ruminate, and a possible heightened response to stress could all contribute to making women more vulnerable.

MYTH #3

ETHNICITY HAS NO BEARING ON DEPRESSION.
Differences in the way people from various cultures express depression can result in a missed diagnosis or the wrong medication being prescribed. For instance, "having nerves" in most Caucasian-American cultures means you're anxious or stressed out; in Latino culture, it can mean you're depressed," says Carolyn Kaufman, Psy.D., of Columbus State Community College in Columbus, OH. So a Latina woman could walk away from her doctor with a prescription for an anti-anxiety medication when what she really needs is an antidepressant. The shocker: Doctors from the same ethnic backgrounds as their patients aren't always better at figuring out what's what. What to do? Make sure your physician can repeat back to you, in different words, what it is that she thinks you're feeling.

MYTH #4

ETHNICITY SHOULDN'T AFFECT YOUR PRESCRIPTION.
Most drugs are tested on white men. But about 40 percent of African- Americans and Asian-Americans actually metabolize drugs more slowly than Caucasians do, as a result of a genetic difference in liver enzymes, according to research conducted by L. DiAnne Bradford, Ph.D., of More house School of Medicine in Atlanta. The impact: They wind up with more of the drug in their bodies, which increases side effects (insomnia, diminished libido, and scores of others) without increasing benefits.

MYTH #5

DEPRESSION IS GENETIC.
Scientists think that both your genes and your environment affect your mood. No one has found a gene that's directly responsible for depression, but you can inherit one type of gene that can make you more vulnerable to depression after stressful events. So, while you may be able to blame your family for many things, it's not all their fault if you're depressed.

MYTH #6

ANTIDEPRESSANTS MAKE YOU FAT.
Most antidepressants do carry about a 30-percent chance that you'll gain weight, says Thomas L. Schwartz, M.D., of State University of New York Upstate Medical University. But one, Wellbutrin XL (buproprion), may cause you to shed a few pounds. Other antidepressants raise serotonin, the chemical that regulates appetite, and may make you feel famished. Even if you eat less, the serotonin might make you store more fat and sugar. But buproprion raises levels of norepinephrine and dopamine, not serotonin, thus avoiding appetite issues.

MYTH #7

DEPRESSION IS ALL IN YOUR HEAD.
Physical illness can trigger depression. One pathway may have to do with cytokines, a natural part of the body's immune response to illness. In fact, when some patients are treated with a certain type of cytokine, they become depressed or even suicidal. In addition, a mood disorder can potentially affect the body's ability to fight an illness, says David Spiegel, M.D., of Stanford University School of Medicine. Stress can lead to arterial spasms and heart attacks, even if your arteries are clear. Depression is also associated with a poorer prognosis for diseases including stroke, epilepsy, and diabetes. Bottom line: Get treatment for both your physical illness and your depression.

 

Our Sponsors

Our Partners