THE SOUTH AFRICAN
DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY
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IN THE WORKPLACE

New Research on Depression in the Workplace.

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JOURNAL

Mental Health Matters Journal for Psychiatrists & GP's

MHM September 207x300

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SPEAKING BOOKS

suicide book

Literacy is a luxury that many of us take for granted.  We depend on written communication for information, guidance, and access to heath care information That is why SADAG created SPEAKING BOOKS and revolutionized the way information is delivered to low literacy communities. It's exactly what it sounds like.a book that talks to the reader in his or her local  language, delivering critical information in an interactive, and educational way.

The customizable 16-page book, accompanied by local celebrity audio recordings, ensures that vital health and social messages can be seen, heard, read and understood..

We started with books on Teen Suicide prevention , HIV, AIDS and Depression, Understanding Mental Health and have developed over 30 titles, such as TB, Malaria, Polio, Vaccines for over 30 countries.

depression book

Early study found higher rates than in people with heart attacks, diabetes, cancer

THURSDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- About one in 12 stroke survivors in the United States thinks about suicide or wishes that they were dead, a new study indicates.
The findings suggest that it might be a good idea to regularly screen stroke survivors for depression and suicidal thoughts, the researchers said.
The investigators analyzed data from the 2005 to 2010 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys and found that nearly 8 percent of stroke survivors reported suicidal thoughts, compared with about 6 percent of heart attack survivors, 5 percent of diabetes patients and 4 percent of cancer patients.
The proportion of stroke survivors who thought about suicide was surprising, compared to patients with other health issues, noted study lead author Dr. Amytis Towfighi, an assistant professor of clinical neurology at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles and chair of neurology at the Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center.
Stroke survivors who had more severe depression, were younger, had higher body mass index (a measurement of body fat), had less education, and were poorer, single or women were more likely to have suicidal thoughts, according to the study presented Thursday at the American Stroke Association annual meeting, in Honolulu.
Seventeen percent of the people who'd had a stroke also had depression, which is the most common mental health complication in stroke survivors, the study authors noted.
"Given the high prevalence of suicidal thoughts among stroke survivors, perhaps regular screening for suicidal ideation, in addition to depression, is warranted," Towfighi said in an American Heart Association news release.
Because this study was presented at a medical meeting, the data and conclusions should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.
There are about 7 million adult stroke survivors in the United States, according to the American Stroke Association.

 

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