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Literacy is a luxury that many of us take for granted.  We depend on written communication for information, guidance, and access to heath care information That is why SADAG created SPEAKING BOOKS and revolutionized the way information is delivered to low literacy communities. It's exactly what it sounds like.a book that talks to the reader in his or her local  language, delivering critical information in an interactive, and educational way.

The customizable 16-page book, accompanied by local celebrity audio recordings, ensures that vital health and social messages can be seen, heard, read and understood..

We started with books on Teen Suicide prevention , HIV, AIDS and Depression, Understanding Mental Health and have developed over 30 titles, such as TB, Malaria, Polio, Vaccines for over 30 countries.

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by Mjo Odwa | Oct 14, 2017 | Featured 1, News |

The Wits school of human and community development student council commemorated the Global Mental Health Awareness Day on Wednesday, October 10, to dispel the stigma around mental health within the student community.

Emmanguluko Mufamadi
Emmanguluko Mufamadi , a counsellor from the South African Depression and Anxiety Group, tells students how to find professional help Photo:Odwa Mjo

The Wits school of human and community development student council commemorated the Global Mental Health Awareness Day on Wednesday, October 10, to dispel the stigma around mental health within the student community.

The deputy chairperson, Nomasonto Bore, said that mental health was crucial for the well-being of students. “People need to talk about their stress, we want to break that barrier of not being able to speak. We need to talk about it [Mental Health] in a way where you feel you won’t be judged.”

Wits Counselling, Careers and Development Unit, Lifeline and the South African Depression and Anxiety Group were part of the Awareness Day.

Lifeline counsellor and community development coordinator, Malashi Mabunda, said, “It’s very important to ensure your emotional wellness, if not, it will affect you holistically. If your routine has changed and it is very hard for you to cope, you should take it further and seek professional help. You need to be honest with yourself if you’re not coping.”

Third year BSc General student, Nokukhanya Ndiniso said, “As black people we often don’t relate with psychology because it doesn’t come in an Afrocentric manner. It doesn’t seem like a cool thing to say ‘I’m depressed’. We want to show students that it is here and we wanted to make it relatable to people.”

Master’s student Sinenhlanhla Ngidi said, “I’ve learnt that mental health affects the way you think and feel. If that is neglected, imagine what it can do. School can affect mental health, it can also expose them [students] to unhealthy coping mechanisms such as drinking alcohol.”

Ngidi added that the conversations about mental health need to be normalized the same way as other chronic diseases such as cancer and HIV/AIDS.

From Wits Vuvuzela - 14 Oct 2017

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