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New Research on Depression in the Workplace.

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JOURNAL

Mental Health Matters Journal for Psychiatrists & GP's

MHM Volume5 Issue5

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SPEAKING BOOKS

depression speaking book

Literacy is a luxury that many of us take for granted.  We depend on written communication for information, guidance, and access to heath care information That is why SADAG created SPEAKING BOOKS and revolutionized the way information is delivered to low literacy communities. It's exactly what it sounds like.a book that talks to the reader in his or her local  language, delivering critical information in an interactive, and educational way.

The customizable 16-page book, accompanied by local celebrity audio recordings, ensures that vital health and social messages can be seen, heard, read and understood..

We started with books on Teen Suicide prevention , HIV, AIDS and Depression, Understanding Mental Health and have developed over 30 titles, such as TB, Malaria, Polio, Vaccines for over 30 countries.

suicide speaking book

So your doctor or health care provider has diagnosed you with postpartum depression. Now what? First, and most importantly, don’t be embarrassed or ashamed. Many new moms deal with a wide range of emotions after having a baby. You’ve done the right thing to seek help.

There are a variety of ways to treat postpartum depression. Your doctor likely will talk with you about whether you want to see a counselor. He also may talk to you about taking antidepressants, medications that treat depression, and which should help you feel more like yourself.

How Do Antidepressants Work?

Antidepressants affect certain brain chemicals called neurotransmitters. There are lots of antidepressants. Some types work on different brain chemicals than others.

Many of the new antidepressants have fewer side effects than some older ones. But each targets different brain chemicals, so some work better for certain people than others.

Newer antidepressants include:

Older antidepressants include:

It can take several weeks for antidepressants to be fully effective, so be patient. With some, you’ll slowly increase your dosage. With others you can take the full dose right away.

If you don’t get relief, tell your doctor or counselor. You may do better with a different dosage or another medication. You and your doctor can find the medicine, or combination of medicines, that works best for you.

Side Effects

The latest antidepressants on the market have few side effects, but you should still watch for:

Older antidepressants may cause:

Can I Still Breastfeed?

If you’re still nursing your baby, you’re probably wondering if it’s safe to take antidepressants. Most likely yes, depending on the medication.

Antidepressants have shown up in breast milk in very low amounts. Studies have found that neither the old or new drugs have harmful effects on babies when small amounts are passed through breast milk. But be sure to tell your doctor that you’re nursing, just to be safe.

More than Meds

Even if your doctor prescribes medication, you still might want to think about attending counseling sessions, or talk therapy, as part of your treatment.

Also, it’s important to take care of yourself every day to help boost your mood.

Do I Need Therapy for Postpartum Depression?

When you have postpartum depression, you want relief. You need to feel like yourself again and start to enjoy your new baby. Your doctor can offer you help, and for many women counseling is part of the solution.

What is Talk Therapy?

Postpartum depression is a severe form of clinical depression related to pregnancy and childbirth.

As with other cases of depression, doctors often suggest counseling, also known as talk therapy, as one form of treatment. If you and your doctor decide that this will help, you will meet with a counselor on a regular basis to talk.

You don’t need to do anything special to prepare. Your counselor will ask questions about your life, and it’s important you answer honestly. You won’t be judged for what you tell, and whatever you talk about will be just between the two of you.

Your counselor will teach you how to look at some things differently, and how to change certain habits to help yourself feel better. Therapy is personalized for everyone, but women in counseling for postpartum depression often discuss topics including:

Your feelings. Are you overwhelmed? Do you connect well with your new baby?

Your beliefs. Do you think you fall short on how new mothers should act?

Your behavior. What might you be doing that keeps you feeling so low?

Your life now. It’s changed a lot. Are you finding it hard to adjust? Are you missing your pre-baby life?

Your history. What details about you -- your past, your family and your partner, for instance -- do you think are important?

How Will Counseling Help?

There are two common types of therapy for women with postpartum depression:

Cognitive behavioral therapy. You and your counselor work together to identify, then change, thoughts and behaviors that are harmful to your mental health.

Interpersonal therapy. Your therapist helps you better understand how you behave in your relationships and how to work through any problems.

To benefit most from either type of therapy, you should attend sessions regularly. Your counselor may want to see you weekly, or maybe more or less often.

Your counseling could last for a few weeks or months, or for a year or more. The length of time will depend on what you and your counselor discuss. But the key to improvement is to go to your appointments.

Do I Need Therapy for Postpartum Depression?

Articles OnPostpartum Depression Treatments

When you have postpartum depression, you want relief. You need to feel like yourself again and start to enjoy your new baby. Your doctor can offer you help, and for many women counseling is part of the solution.

What is Talk Therapy?

Postpartum depression is a severe form of clinical depression related to pregnancy and childbirth.

As with other cases of depression, doctors often suggest counseling, also known as talk therapy, as one form of treatment. If you and your doctor decide that this will help, you will meet with a counselor on a regular basis to talk.

You don’t need to do anything special to prepare. Your counselor will ask questions about your life, and it’s important you answer honestly. You won’t be judged for what you tell, and whatever you talk about will be just between the two of you.

Your counselor will teach you how to look at some things differently, and how to change certain habits to help yourself feel better. Therapy is personalized for everyone, but women in counseling for postpartum depression often discuss topics including:

Your feelings. Are you overwhelmed? Do you connect well with your new baby?

Your beliefs. Do you think you fall short on how new mothers should act?

Your behavior. What might you be doing that keeps you feeling so low?

Your life now. It’s changed a lot. Are you finding it hard to adjust? Are you missing your pre-baby life?

Your history. What details about you -- your past, your family and your partner, for instance -- do you think are important?

How Will Counseling Help?

There are two common types of therapy for women with postpartum depression:

Cognitive behavioral therapy. You and your counselor work together to identify, then change, thoughts and behaviors that are harmful to your mental health.

Interpersonal therapy. Your therapist helps you better understand how you behave in your relationships and how to work through any problems.

To benefit most from either type of therapy, you should attend sessions regularly. Your counselor may want to see you weekly, or maybe more or less often.

Your counseling could last for a few weeks or months, or for a year or more. The length of time will depend on what you and your counselor discuss. But the key to improvement is to go to your appointments.

Beyond Talk Therapy

You may need more than counseling. That’s OK. Different combinations of talk therapy, medication, and exercise can get you relief.

Medicine. Antidepressants are drugs designed to treat depression, including postpartum depression. They work on different chemicals in your brain. Many doctors prescribe antidepressants to their patients with postpartum depression while they’re also in counseling. Some are even safe to use while you breastfeed. Just let your doctor know if you’re nursing.

Self-care. Get more sleep and exercise, eat healthy foods, do fun activities and relax. Doing these things can help to boost your mood.

How to Find a Therapist

If you’re looking for a mental health counselor, ask your family doctor to refer you to someone in your area. Family, friends, or SADAG 011 234 4837 or 0800  323 323 .

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